Why I’m still using Fedora 13

I must say I’m impressed with the latest Fedora. I haven’t met any deal-breakers for me yet, but then again, I’ve only used it for a week. Still, there’s much to like.

[Updated with more likes and less dislikes!]

  • I like the speed. I haven’t enabled desktop effects which helps in that department, but nonetheless the system feels snappy and responsive. I have the impression that Ubuntu boots a bit faster, but performs a bit slower when logged in.
  • I like the looks. Of course, that’s subjective, but again it feels lighter than Ubuntu (which is a bit ironic I guess, since their theme is called “Light”). I don’t hate the default Ubuntu colour scheme as many seem to do, but it isn’t particularly attractive to me either. I think blue’s a good choice, and the default background looks fantastic.
    The Plymouth Charge theme is back too, which marks the first time ever that I think booting the PC looks better in Linux than it does in Windows or OSX.
    Of course, I did change background, theme and icon theme since installing Fedora, but that’s beside the point. Why? Because I said so!
  • I like how I read everywhere that I SELinux is annoying and I’d best disable it…I haven’t, and didn’t notice any problems at all.
  • I like how the screen gets locked after a short time. I always forget to do that. This may well be the default behaviour in other distributions too, but in Arch I never got around to enabling it.
  • I like yum. By now, I’ve been using CLI package management for so long, I dislike using the GUI for it. It’s not as fast as pacman, but commands are a bit easier, and information is presented in an orderly and attractive way.
  • I like how this is the first time ever Thunar shows the thumbnails of cbr (rar) and cbz (zip) files. Using Comix, these always showed in Nautilus and have never ever showed up in any other file manager. This is a first.
  • I like the firewall running by default. I know I should set this up myself (after all, using Linux doesn’t mean you’re safe from the worst the interwebs have to offer), but I can never be bothered. Fedora feeds my laziness.
  • I like Adam Williamson.

There are some dislikes too though. In climbing order of annoyance:

  • Every time I open my Downloads folders in Nautilus, I get a prompt, telling me I can share this folder with Bluetooth. Great. I don’t want to. Leave me alone. Solved this by uninstalling gnome-user-share. It’s not ideal, but I don’t need it anyway.
  • Emelfm2 never fails to crash when I try to create a new directory. I had this same problem in Archlinux a couple of months ago, but it has been fixed since then. I have still to check if Fedora is using an older build. Miraculously solved itself…now it sometimes fails to crash. Most of the time, it still does though.
  • Brasero refused to burn audio cds this morning, telling me it failed because of an Unknown Error. I’m planning to look into that this evening, and I hope I can either fix it or find a replacement for Brasero. Probably due to a weird character in one of the filenames. I renamed all the files I wanted to burn and now the problem’s gone.
  • Nautilus can’t determina the name of the Samba file shares on the fileserver I have running. I enabled smbclient in the firewall. Obvious, really.

So there you have it. Fedora somehow turns out to be perfect.

San

8 Responses to Why I’m still using Fedora 13

  1. aw! I like you too.😛

    nice follow-up, thnaks for posting it.

    “Every time I open my Downloads folders in Nautilus, I get a prompt, telling me I can share this folder with Bluetooth. Great. I don’t want to. Leave me alone.”

    Yeah, I agree with this. It should really have an option that says “I don’t want to, quit bugging me’.

    “Brasero refused to burn audio cds this morning, telling me it failed because of an Unknown Error. I’m planning to look into that this evening, and I hope I can either fix it or find a replacement for Brasero. Probably due to a weird character in one of the filenames. I renamed all the files I wanted to burn and now the problem’s gone.”

    I find Brasero sometimes reports an error when there wasn’t actually anything wrong with the burned disc, so you might want to check and see if it’s actually fine. Otherwise, try gnomebaker, k3b or just wodim (cdrecord) at the console.

  2. celettu says:

    Hey Adam!

    Nah, the cd remained completely empty, and the log was cut halfway in a “sentence”. Very odd.
    I contemplated using gnomebaker if I couldn’t get Brasero to work, but since it did, no worries.
    Hate to install k3b in GNOME..while it’s the best burning software there is, I don’t like mixing toolkits. It’s almost like a physical itch🙂

  3. Chris Smart says:

    I second Adam’s suggestion of installing K3b. Brasero has never worked properly for me on dozens of computers over time. K3b is great.

    -c

  4. celettu says:

    No no. Itch. ITCH!

  5. Chris Smart says:

    Get anything with this?
    rpm -qa |egrep -i “qt|kde”

    -c

    • celettu says:

      Hey Chris,

      At work atm (Windows! Argh!), so I can’t test that, but unless the default installation of Fedora GNOME includes qt or kde packages, I don’t have them installed.

  6. Chris Smart says:

    Yeah, OK. Just thought I’d check just in case! If you use VirtualBox for example, it will pull in Qt. If you already have Qt and or some KDE libs, then your system is already “tainted” and you can use K2b😉

    -c

  7. Rahul Sundaram says:

    It would be great if you file bug reports on problems you encounter and add references to them. That way, we have an much easier way to keep track of the problems and hopefully resolve them quickly.

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